Megan Fox opens up about having body dysmorphia

12 October 2021, 11:38

Jazmin Duribe

By Jazmin Duribe

"We may look at somebody and think, 'That person’s so beautiful. Their life must be so easy.' They most likely don’t feel that way about themselves."

Megan Fox has opened up about having body dysmorphia.

According to the NHS, body dysmorphia is a mental health condition where a "person spends a lot of time worrying about flaws in their appearance. These flaws are often unnoticeable to others". The condition, which can lead to depression, can affect anyone but it's most common in teens and young adults. Luckily, body dysmorphia can be treated with therapy or antidepressants.

In an interview with GQ alongside her boyfriend Machine Gun Kelly, the Jennifer's Body actress admitted that she had the condition and although she is often hailed as being one of the most beautiful women in the world, appearances can be deceiving.

READ MORE: Megan Fox wants a Jennifer's Body sequel or TV show

Megan Fox opens up about having body dysmorphia
Megan Fox opens up about having body dysmorphia. Picture: @meganfox via Instagram, Alamy

"We may look at somebody and think, 'That person’s so beautiful. Their life must be so easy.' They most likely don’t feel that way about themselves," Megan explained. "Yeah, I have body dysmorphia. I have a lot of deep insecurities."

Megan has discussed her mental health issues in the past, previously stating that she reached "breaking point" after the release of Jennifer's Body in 2009. Megan found that she was constantly being sexualised in the industry, which led her to have a "psychological breakdown".

"It wasn’t just that movie, it was every day of my life, all the time, with every project I worked on and every producer I worked with. It preceded a breaking point for me," Megan told Entertainment Tonight.

"I think I had a genuine psychological breakdown where I wanted just nothing to do. I didn't want to be seen, I didn’t want to have to take a photo, do a magazine, walk a carpet, I didn’t want to be seen in public at all because of the fear, and the belief, and the absolute certainty that I was going to be mocked, or spat at, or someone was going to yell at me, or people would stone me or savage me for just being out."