What does Soaking mean on TikTok? The viral NSFW phrase explained

27 September 2021, 15:32

The phrase Soaking has gone viral on social media.

Another day, another phrase that's gone viral on TikTok.

Over the past year, TikTok users have been expanding their vocabulary thanks to countless viral trends, phrases, new slang terms and everything in between. Devious lick? Cheugy? Sizing up? 1437? Check, check, check andddd check.

The term 'Soaking' or 'Soak' has now gone viral on the platform, with some videos getting millions of views. Many non-religious people and people who aren't part of the Mormon church are now finding out what it apparently means.

It turns out that the phrase is the name of a sexual act but it's allegedly used by those who don't consider it to be actual sex. Here's what it means.

What does Soaking mean in the Mormon religion?

What does Soaking mean? The viral TikTok phrase explained
What does Soaking mean? The viral TikTok phrase explained. Picture: Thiago Prudêncio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images, @funeralpotatoslut

According to Urban Dictionary, and the many explanations that have since made their way on to social media, the term 'soaking' means "to place [the] penis in [the] vagina, and not move in and out."

It's been claimed that some teenagers within the Mormon community allegedly consider 'soaking' as a way of protecting and preserving their virginity. It's apparently not viewed as having sex because no one is moving or thrusting. The act is also known as "floating".

Some people believe it to be an urban legend, while others claim that it's a real thing.

According to MEL Magazine, the trend was allegedly popularised at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. BYU students are expected to follow an "honor code" which asks them to abstain from things like pre-marital sex and the consumption of drugs and alcohol.

The term has now gone viral on TikTok thanks to a series of videos from user @funeralpotatoslut, who is an ex-Mormon. One particular video referencing "soaking" on their account now has over 3.3 million views.

The term also went viral back in March 2021 when ex-Mormon content creator @exmolex answered a series of questions about it in a video.

Well, you learn something new every day...

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